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The César of Shame

I’d hope my first article was going to be more joyful but I am afraid I’m terribly upset by what happen at the César last Saturday…
For those who don’t know the César is the national film award of France, which brings together everyone that works within the French film industry.

The 28th February 2020 was the 45th ceremony and it was sounding bad before it even started. Indeed there was a big scandal already about the 12 nominations of Roman Polanski a French-polish film director.
12; the same number as the amount of women he as allegedly abused. Actually not women, but girls since (if the complaints happened to be true) 10 of them were minor at the time. In 1977, Polanski was arrested in the US and charged with drugging and raping a 13year old. He pled guilty to the lesser offence of unlawful sex with a minor before escaping to Europe. He is still pursued by the USA police to this day.
So imagine the disappointment to see this man not only nominated but awarded; an insult to all the victims of abuse.

However in all this disgrace there is a light, the bravery of many women act regarding the event. Actress Adèle Haenel stormed out of the ceremony after the announcement of Polanski’s win and shouted “La honte” (=shame) as she left, followed by many of her peers.
Florence Foresti the hostess of the 45th Cesar ceremony and very well known French humorist did not return to host the rest of the ceremony and posted later on her twitter account “Écœurée” (=disgusted).
Tens of protesters, mostly women, were expressing their anger at the red carpet. And on Twitter the #Jesuisunevictime (I am a victime) being female and male victimes of abuse telling their story have reached more the 16.7K tweets.
The shame need to change sides. The system we live in is a society where I personally don’t know any women from the age 20 onwards who hasn’t experienced some type of assault. Changes are starting to happened thanks to great women like Adèle Haenel and thanks to the rise of awareness.
Sorry this article was not about women in the music industry but it is important to show strong examples to follow in a world that we hope is evolving toward equality and respect.